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2020 Program

We look forward to welcoming you to the 2020 Charleston Heritage Symposium,
celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the
Preservation Society of Charleston.
Limited to 80 patrons, the Symposium offers a delightful flower-filled spring weekend in this historic South Carolina seaport renowned for its landmark buildings, magnificent homes, and gracious hospitality.

Join our outstanding roster of presenters as we examine some of the beautiful and interesting art, restored architecture, literature, and trends which came out of the Charleston Renaissance of the 1920’s and 1930’s. The Charleston Renaissance is a period between World Wars I and II in which the city experienced a boom in the arts as artists, writers, architects, and historical preservationists came together to improve and represent their city.   

We are honored to have Sylvia Yount, Lawrence A. Fleischman Curator in Charge of the American Wing, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, open this year’s program as the Keynote Speaker on Friday evening.

In addition to lectures, we will be visiting a grand private home, built in 1835, opened by the owners especially for the Symposium. The house is recently restored and we are delighted to visit this classic Charleston double-house.

As the Charleston Heritage Symposium tends to sell out quickly, you are encouraged to sign up early.

 

FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2020

5:30-6:30 p.m. 
Symposium Registration and Opening Night Reception:
Old Federal Court Room, 23 Chalmers Street
Built in the early 19th-century, the building housed the U.S. District Court from 1845 to 1860 before becoming part of the Confederate Home and College property. In 1867 Mary Amarinthia Snowden and her sister, Isabella Yates Snowden, established a home for Confederate widows and orphans. Later they started a college on the premises. It is still known as the Confederate Home. The spirit of compassion of the Snowden sisters lives on today as the Confederate Home and College is a source of 5 college scholarships and moderately priced housing for qualified residents.

6:30-7:30 p.m. 
Southern Passages: Charleston Renaissance Artists and Issues in a National Context
Keynote Address with Sylvia Yount
Lawrence A. Fleischman Curator in Charge of the American Wing, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY

Introduction by Symposium Moderator and Curator-in-Residence, 
Robert A. Leath, Chief Curator and Vice President of Collections and Research, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts at Old Salem, Winston-Salem, NC

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020

8:15 a.m.
Coffee Service: Old Federal Court Room, 23 Chalmers Street 

9:00-9:15 a.m.
Welcoming Remarks and Preservation Society Overview
Kristopher B. King
Executive Director, Preservation Society of Charleston, Charleston, SC

9:15-10:15 a.m.
The Past and Its Presence: Charleston and Its Renaissance
Harlan Greene, Scholar in Residence at Special Collections, Addlestone Library at the College of Charleston, Charleston, SC

10:30-11:30 a.m.
The du Ponts: The Charleston Connections
Tom Savage, Director of External Affairs for Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library, Winterthur, DE

11:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
“Now is the time……tomorrow will be too late”
Kristopher B. King, Executive Director, Preservation Society of Charleston, Charleston, SC

12:45-2:00 p.m.
Midday Break
Box lunches are being provided 
 Old Federal Court Room, 23 Chalmers Street

2:00-3:00 p.m.
The 1927-1928 “Renascence” of Carter’s Grove
Ralph Harvard, Ralph Harvard, Inc., New York, NY

3:15-4:15 p.m.
The Commerce of Authenticity
Lauren Brunk, Vice President, Brunk Auctions, Ashville, NC

4:15-4:30 p.m.
Symposium Synopsis and introduction to the Study House, the Johnston House.
Robert A. Leath, Chief Curator and Vice President of Collections and Research, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts at Old Salem, Winston-Salem, NC

6:00-7:30 p.m.
Evening Soirée at the Johnston House (c. 1835) 
Built in 1835 this recently restored Charleston double-house, the Johnston House, was built by sisters Anne and Catherine Johnston. The grand three-story house retains its original substantial wood picket fence on masonry piers, and carved lattice gates. It features a three-tiered piazza, and attached kitchen building.  The current owner will give an overview of the history of the house, and some of the lovely decorative arts.

Shuttles are provided to the Johnston House from the Old Federal Court Room.

SUNDAY, MARCH 15, 2020

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Study Tour of Documents, Papers, and Books from the Charleston Renaissance at the South Carolina Historical Museum
The South Carolina Historical Museum is housed in a National Historic Landmark Building. The Fireproof Building built in 1827 in the Greek Revival style, with Doric porticoes north and south. The building was created to house the office and records of Charleston County. The contractor, John G. Spidle, built it to the design of Robert Mills. Harlan Greene will lead us through letters from the Gershwin’s, and Dubose Heyward, on “Porgy and Bess”, photos, papers, and books from this era.

This special visit includes Bloody Marys and a light brunch.